I am a Democrat in California, and I will be voting in the 2021 Gubernatorial Recall Election, the farce of democracy that Republicans have foisted upon the state to attempt to remove Gavin Newsom from office a year before his term expires. Obviously I will be voting “no” on the first question on the ballot, whether or not to remove Gavin Newsom from office. But I don’t know how I’ll be voting on the second question, which asks me to pick a replacement governor should the “yes” votes on question 1 get a majority. Strategically it does not make sense…


Two days after the election, on November 5, House Democrats held a private conference call to air grievences. Before the election, the party was expected to win a majority of 43 seats according to the FiveThirtyEight model, which would be a pick up of 7 seats, but it was clear by that Thursday that the party’s majority would be substantially narrowed. Abigail Spanberger, a Blue Dog Democrat from Virginia and member of the Problem Solvers caucus inspired by centrist political organization No Labels, blamed progressive Democrats in heated terms. She perceived that the problem was that left-wing messaging, specifically regarding…


California is slowly opening up. Restrictions put into place in the middle of March by county and state governments are being loosened. It has now been almost three weeks since Governor Gavin Newsom moved the state into the earliest phases of Stage 2, and almost two weeks since Los Angeles County opened up its beaches for active use only.

The gradual opening may be accelerating the number of COVID-19 cases. But the acceleration is not happening evenly across all cities. …


A month ago, I started looking at COVID-19 data from cities in southern California and distinguishing the rates of laboratory confirmed cases by community characteristics such as race, income, and age. At the time I found that confirmed cases of COVID-19 are most prevalent in wealthy and white communities. But that finding no longer applies.

This was the relationship between the laboratory confirmed COVID-19 case rate and a city’s median household income for cities in southern California as of March 30, 2020.

Cities with median annual household incomes above $110,000 had a COVID-19 case rate of 34.3 cases per 100,000…


First off, this is a story about who is getting tested, not about which communities actually have the highest numbers of individuals with the novel coronavirus.

In southern California, Los Angeles County’s and Orange County’s health agencies have been releasing the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases on a city by city basis. I took the data and analyzed it against certain demographic categories from US Census data from 2018 to see what could be learned from this data regarding the differences in populations.

Scatter plot showing increasing rate of confirmed COVID-19 cases with increasing city median income, r²=0.2227

A fairly clear increasing trend is revealed when confirmed COVID-19 cases are plotted against the median income…


The June 5 primary is more important than the November 2018 general election, but few people vote in off-year primaries. California’s primary on June 5 has the potential for depressing turnout even more based on the sheer overwhelming number of names and offices on the ballot. My ballot will be five pages long and I will have 157 names to choose from, not counting write-ins and ballot initiatives.

But I’m a voter, and I regard it as my constitutional duty to do the research necessary to get a handle on this stuff. So I read candidate statements and did internet…


Fucking hell, Georgia Democrats. What’s it going to take to get you to get out and vote? Yes, voting is inconvenient. Yes, your vote doesn’t matter because you’re just one person and there are hundreds of thousands of people who live in your congressional district. And your congress person isn’t going to stop all the bad things from happening anyways. But the same thing applies to Republicans and there isn’t an election they don’t turn out to. And because they vote, they have power.

Republicans. They probably don’t even know who the speaker of the house is, but they sure…


When the Orange County voter information pamphlet came in the mail the other day, that was pretty much the first time this cycle that I thought about the city council election for the City of Placentia. I’ve always been flummoxed as to who I should be voting for for city council, and this year is especially bad since there are nine candidates on the ballot running for three seats on the five-seat council.

I like to think that I am a relatively civically aware person, but I really couldn’t have told you anything about the Placentia city council beyond the…

railrunner

I am not actually a train. Or a roadrunner. But I am originally from New Mexico.

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